TOP
STORIES
 1 of 5
12 Slam Dunk March Madness Arenas of 2015
These NCAA championship arenas are high-tech with stunning video displays and on-site support from Daktronics.
 2 of 5
Netflix's 'House of Cards' Puts AMX in the White House
Producers of popular Netflix TV show contacted AMX to ensure complete accuracy in TV depiction of United States White House communications.
 3 of 5
5,000 Cute Animals and Some Tech Stuff Too
Toronto Zoo boosts digital signage and advertising real estate, supports energy conservation with weatherproof displays from SunBriteTV.
 4 of 5
The Scoop on 6 Popular Collaboration Platforms
You need to know the ins and outs of these unified communication, collaboration and huddle room solutions in order to make the best recommendation to your clients.
 5 of 5
Flashback Friday: 11 High-Tech March Madness Arenas of 2014
These NCAA championship arenas are fully equipped with stunning video displays and on-site support from Daktronics.
Technology’s Role in Reducing Healthcare Costs
Medical technology is a huge growth sector that will consume vast amounts of A/V and IT integration.

Article


October 27, 2011 By Dan Daley

During 2010, healthcare costs in the U.S. were estimated to be about 16 percent of the country’s $14.8 trillion GDP, more than double what healthcare as a percentage of GDP was in 1970.

What to do about the cost of healthcare is a hot-button issue in politics, but integrators can be sure of one thing: The answer is inevitably going to have to rely to a significant extent on A/V systems technology for solutions.

Already, HD video conferencing systems are being used for doctor-patient consultations, for remote diagnosis, for medical training and other applications. Digital signage is being used to link local and regional medical centers, as are data server/storage systems that can maintain voluminous amounts of patient data and still be compliant with the mandates of the HIPAA Act to assure patient confidentiality and data security.

New configurations of healthcare delivery, such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACO), that seek to improve the quality of care while simultaneously reducing costs through coordination and collaboration among providers will rely heavily on these kinds of technologies for successful implementation.

According to the American Hospital Association, the costs associated with developing these capabilities, including A/V and IT systems, range from $5.3 to $12 million per facility and are expected to increase.

John Laughlin, president of Conference Technologies, says that changes in medical practices are also driving A/V in those spaces.

“We see a trend that with the aid of nurse practitioners, doctors have more of an opportunity to assist in multiple locations utilizing audio-visual technology,” he says. “High-definition video conferencing along with increased data feedback options from medical equipment are giving medical professionals an entirely new set of tools to use. This allows doctors real-time feedback with very sharp and clear images that standard definition never allowed. Many times it’s referred to as the spoke and hub: one doctor supports, for instance, five offices, with nurse practitioners located in every office.”

Rich Mullen, a CTS at Vistacom, is the de facto health care systems specialist at an integrator that specializes in medical systems environments. “Our first inroads into the healthcare industry began 20 years ago with basic nurse call systems,” Mullen recalls. “But in the 1990s we saw many healthcare institutions migrating quickly to remote diagnostics and telemedicine, specifically with orthopedic and neurological departments.

“The hot trend now is in early stroke detection using remote diagnostics. A lot of hospitals are trying to implement as much remote diagnostics as possible. The problem is, though, they’re looking at the end nodes on the system rather than starting with the network, the information infrastructure to handle all these asset management and data transmissions. That’s where we saw our opportunity to really create custom solutions around medical systems clients.”

Mullen cites Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa., as an example of a hospital that figured out that it had to put the network horse before the cart - literally, as the hospital prepared to deploy wireless Computer On Wheels (COW) carts that bring diagnosis and treatment options to the bedside.

About the author
Veteran reporter Dan Daley is based in New York City and Nashville, Tenn.
View all posts by Dan Daley
Social Bookmark or Share This
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Windows Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Evernote
  • E-mail


  • Latest
  • Blogs
  • Photos
  • Resources



Recent comments

Thanks for your comment, Kaleo. InfoComm itself is not criticizing its members for not making the $2,000 commitment.…

Posted by D. Craig MacCormack on 2015 03 23 · commented on
'Kudos to InfoComm, Shame on Its Members'.

I agree with Max.  I would rather hire someone who wants to be in our awesome industry.  I don’t…

Posted by Kaleo Lee on 2015 03 23 · commented on
'Kudos to InfoComm, Shame on Its Members'.

Thanks for your comment, Max. The headline is supposed to convey that I think it’s a good thing InfoComm…

Posted by D. Craig MacCormack on 2015 03 20 · commented on
'Kudos to InfoComm, Shame on Its Members'.

The title of this article is misleading.  Infocomm IS its members.  You can’t say shame on…

Posted by Max Kopsho on 2015 03 20 · commented on
'Kudos to InfoComm, Shame on Its Members'.