COVID-19 Update

Take Note of M2D Kiosks at ISE to Partner with Manufacturers Across the Pond

Integrated Systems Europe 2016 will encourage relationships with manufacturers, distributors and integrators all over the world, making it easier to take your business abroad.

Tim Albright

In AVNation‘s most recent episode of AVWeek (episode 231) we talked about CI editor-at-large Craig MacCormack’s article on globalization.

Companies like AVI-SPL and Verrex have been doing installations across the pond successfully for a number of years. There have been some learning pains and experiences they probably don’t wish to repeat but overall these integrators have found a way to make it work.

Another interview I did that week with ISE‘s Michael Blackman came to mind. During our talk Blackman mentioned a feature at the trade show that is not only simple in it’s idea but brilliant as far as getting companies from other countries to work together. It’s called M2D; manufacturer to distributor.

If you are attending the show there will be several kiosks where you can search by country to see if there are manufacturers looking to get distributors where you live. Then you simply go to their booth and strike up a conversation. ISE is like any other show; deals are done on the show floor all the time. That’s kind of the idea.

What Else Is Happening at ISE 2016? Find Out Here.

There are a number of integrators who also act as distributors for products they have found useful and haven’t found distributors for themselves. This is a good source of revenue if you find a product that fits a need, fixes a problem or is comparable to something you already use at a greatly reduced rate. If you are going to the show, make certain to find one of these kiosks and check them out. If you’re not, I will write a piece while I’m there highlighting those who are looking for North American distribution.

When working with companies in other countries, make certain you check on a few things. First, what are the laws in your state and with the federal government regarding working with that country? Next, you need to check on tariffs and taxes. A product may be 50 or 60 percent less expensive than its competitor but factor in all the import fees associated with bringing it to your site. Lastly, there is the issue of documentation. You are probably like me and have gotten a manual for a product in the box that was not written in my native language. Make certain you work out the details with the manufacturer as to whose responsibility it is to make the translation.

Overall, working with other countries is a great experience. You get to learn new business practices and customs as well as gain new ideas. It can be a challenge for sure, but in the long run it is so worth it. The world is getting smaller. You need to equip yourself to work beyond your borders.