Cutting Edge AV from The Sextant Group Tells the Story of Native American Culture at Scottsdale Community College

The new Cloud Song Center at Scottsdale Community College includes an innovative Native American culture center with advanced AV from Sextant Group.

Leave a Comment
Cutting Edge AV from The Sextant Group Tells the Story of Native American Culture at Scottsdale Community College

Rendering of Cloud Song Center at Scottsdale Community College. Credit: Architekton

Scottsdale Community College in Arizona is the only public two-year college that’s on an Indian reservation, making it all the more fitting that its new 33,000-square-foot Cloud Song Center set to open in Fall 2018 will include an innovative Native American culture center with cutting-edge AV (audio-video).

The plan is for Cloud Song Center to be a cultural center for the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC), host the college’s business program and include:

  • Indigenous Scholars Institute
  • A Community Center
  • Six Business Classrooms
  • An Accounting and Statistics Learning Center
  • Faculty Offices

The building, designed by Arizona-based design firm Architekton and approved by the SRPMIC Design Review process, features an audio-video technology strategy provided by The Sextant Group.

In a press release by The Sextant Group, SRPMIC president Delbert Ray says the new building “multiplies our community’s goal of self-sufficiency and provides the next generation a launching pad into the fast-paced world of technology and innovation.”

Inside the Cloud Song Center

The six classrooms for business students in the Cloud Song Center will be joined by an accounting and statistics learning center, eight faculty offices and other student support space.

The Indigenous Scholars Institute (ISI) side of the building will include a large meeting room, private study rooms, and other shared spaces dedicated to teaching Native American culture, history and current events, according to The Sextant Group.

An outdoor gathering area with a performance circle patterned after other Native American designs such as those seen at the Heard Museum will provide an outdoor space for hosting events and activities.

“This multiplies our community’s goal of self-sufficiency and provides the next generation a launching pad into the fast-paced world of technology and innovation,” says Ray.

Hiegel said the expanded business classrooms and student support offered by the Business School will “help keep grads in Arizona and keep our members happy because they will have a future pool of employees.”

Why the Cloud Song Center Was Needed

Business is Scottsdale Community College’s largest occupational program and most business students graduate with an Associate of Business and successfully transfer to universities to pursue bachelor’s degrees.

The conference rooms are audiovisual-enhanced with video- and web-conferencing capabilities, according to The Sextant Group.

“We’ve been working on this for several years, with the goal of growing our program and producing more business school graduates and transfer opportunities,” says Susan Peterson, interim Dean of Instruction and former chair of the Business and Computer Information Systems Division.

“We’re very happy Scottsdale Community College and the Governing Board see the value of an expanded Business School.”

For The Sextant Group’s part, it provided audio-video technology planning and design services zeroing in on several applications and spaces, including:

  • Audiovisual
  • IT/Telecom
  • Acoustics services for state-of-the-art small classrooms
  • A large active-learning classroom
  • A learning center
  • A large lecture room
  • Conference rooms
  • Huddle rooms
  • Private offices
  • Open pre-function area

The conference rooms are audiovisual-enhanced with video- and web-conferencing capabilities, according to The Sextant Group.

A large meeting room accommodates special events or can be divided into three separate independently operated rooms with ceiling-mounted projectors and motorized screens.

An open area outside the meeting room features two flat panel screens displaying digital signage for pre-function information. Spaces are constructed with specialty acoustical treatments and enhanced sound isolation techniques to eliminate disruptive noises or excess vibrations.

“We value deeply our tremendous partnerships with SRPMIC and the business community and look forward to bringing this project to fruition with their continued support and involvement,” said SCC President Jan Gehler.

“This building will be a destination Native American cultural center, and will support high-quality teaching and learning for many generations of SCC students.”